Norway

“Very few worth bothering about, but the freezing temperatures ensures a long season and they do make the effort building decent parks”

Norway is famous for it’s cross country skiing which is reflected in the fact that although there are over 160 resorts dotted around the country, 80% are simply not ridable. The terrain in the suitable areas is best for novices and intermediates, with little long term interest for advanced riders due to the lack of steep terrain.

Traveling around Norway is made easy by the country’s excellent road and rail network, connecting well with international airports. The main gateway airport with regular international flights is Oslo, but onward travel usually means an extra 2 to 3 hours of travel.

If you’re visiting Norway by car, you can take ferry crossings via ports in the UK, or short crossings from northern ports in Germany and Denmark. Driving in Norway is easy, but snow chains are a must in remote resorts.

The one common factor is Norway is its costs (super expensive in fact). Accommodation is pretty good with the most affordable type being cabins, which cater for groups. Hotels will burn a massive hole in your pocket. Beer prices are so high that evenings in the average bar are out of the question. The best advice is to bring heaps of duty free, or buy your drinks at the off licenses, but note, you have to be 18 to drink beer and 20 to buy or drink spirits.

Overall, Norway is really good but it does have some major drawbacks, like its total lack of music talent, stupidly expensive booze and the world’s worst knitwear. On the other hand, the women in this part of the world are to die for.

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Resorts in Norway

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